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Artifacts Collection

An Inventory of the Artifacts Collection at the Texas State Archives:

Cretaceous Period, 14000 BCE-1987 CE, bulk 1860-1970

Arrangement History Scope and Contents Restrictions Related Materials Inventory

Overview

Texas State Archives and Library Building model (ATF0515)

Title: Artifacts collection
Dates: Cretaceous Period, 14000 BCE-1987 CE
Dates (Bulk): bulk 1860-1970
Abstract: The Artifacts collection at the Texas State Archives is an artificial collection consisting of approximately 590 three-dimensional objects related to Texas history. Primarily dating from 1860 to 1970, the collection comprises objects dating from possibly 1500 to 1987 as well as fossilized items that are likely from the Cretaceous Period and arrowheads that may date as early as 14000 BCE to 1600 CE. This wide assortment of artifacts helps document in material form the lives of those who have resided in Texas over the centuries, from the prehistoric and Pre-Columbian eras to the time that Texas has existed as a colony, republic, and state. Digital images of these artifacts are part of the Texas Digital Archive.
Quantity: 229.89 cubic ft.
Location: Please note that a portion of these materials are stored at the State Records Center. See the “Restrictions on Access” statement in this document for further information.
Language: These materials include writing that is predominately in English with scattered Spanish, French, German, Dutch, Italian, and Latin throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: This EAD finding aid was created in cooperation with Texas Archival Resources Online.

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Other Formats for the Records

A description of the original artifacts referenced in this finding aid is available at https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/70064/tsl-70064.html


Arrangement of the Collection

These records are arranged in consecutive order by artifact number.


Scope and Content of the Collection

The Artifacts collection at the Texas State Archives is an artificial collection consisting of approximately 590 three-dimensional objects related to Texas history. Primarily dating from 1860 to 1970, the collection comprises objects dating from possibly 1500 to 1987 as well as fossilized items that are likely from the Cretaceous Period and arrowheads that may date as early as 14000 BCE to 1600 CE. This wide assortment of artifacts helps document in material form the lives of those who have resided in Texas over the centuries, from the prehistoric and Pre-Columbian eras to the time that Texas has existed as a colony, republic, and state.

The types of artifacts fall into two broad categories. The first consists of objects that were either associated with key historical events or that once belonged to leaders and figures central to Texas history. Highlights include the thimble used by Joanna Troutman in 1835 to make the first Lone Star flag out of her silk skirts; Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar’s dueling pistols from the battle of San Jacinto; the Ark of the Covenant chest made from the wood of Independence Hall where the Texas Declaration of Independence was framed and issued by the Convention of 1836; the silver and ivory carpenter’s ruler used by Elijah E. Myers, architect of the Texas State Capitol; and the suit worn by Governor John B. Connally when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963.

The second category comprises items made and used in the course of daily life by ordinary Texans. Such objects span agricultural implements, ammunition and armaments, military buttons, commemorative china, decorative furnishings, furniture, status symbols, clothing, personal accessories, and toys, among other items. Examples of these artifacts include a collection of cotton-stuffed dolls representing life on a Texas plantation; a variety of stirrups and spurs, guns and rifles, musket balls, and grapeshot; and binoculars donated to the U.S. Navy for use in World War I. Arrowheads made by American Indians residing in what would later become Texas are the earliest man-made objects in the collection.

(Click here to read more of the Scope and Content Note)


Restrictions and Requirements

Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Due to preservation, security, and privacy concerns, some artifacts may not be brought out of storage. For more information, please email State Archives staff at archinfo@tsl.texas.gov and include the artifact number, box number, object name, and any additional description and details about the artifact(s) requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the item(s). Artifacts stored at the State Records Center require an appointment for viewing at that facility.

Restrictions on Use
These images are in the Public Domain under the laws of the United States. The Items and their design depicted in these images may be protected by copyright, patents, trademarks, or other related rights. You are free to use these images in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. Unless expressly stated otherwise, Texas State Library and Archives Commission makes no warranties about the Items and cannot guarantee the accuracy of this Rights Statement. You are responsible for your own use. Please contact the Texas State Library and Archives Commission for more information. You may need to obtain other permissions for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy or moral rights may limit how you may use the material.

Technical Requirements
Some artifacts may require the use of gloves provided by the State Archives for handling.


Click here for a list of materials offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records.


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item by artifact number), Artifacts collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by numerous donors in the 19th and 20th centuries. Not all artifacts have associated accession details. Refer to each artifact’s item-level description in the Texas Digital Archive for available accession information.

Processing Information

Artifact details, photodocumentation, and collection description by Aditi Worcester, 2015

Revisions and additions to artifact details and collection description, further photodocumentation, and DACS compliance by Rebecca Romanchuk, January 2018


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